Rhyme or Reason

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4
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Sept. 25, 2014

Why You Roast - Marshall Hance

Three New Central American coffees

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1
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July 11, 2014

Two new coffees for the holiday weekend

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We're headed into the weekend with two new coffees that side by side represent the rather wide spectrum of "rustic" sweetness. Sumatra Lintong 17+ Toba Batak is a syrupy sweet cup, with flavors of brown rice syrup, wild berry, and fresh herbs. It's one of the sweeter Lintong coffees we've tasted so far, and a welcome addition to the list as we are waiting on other new arrival Sumatras.

Arrival Date

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 The Annex: where most of our coffee (as well as MANY others) is offloaded after arriving at the Port of Oakland.

We get excited about new crop coffees, and while there is almost always some new crop coffee landing, this particular time of year is very hectic with arrivals.  I thought now would be a good time to explain more about what exactly the "Arrival Date" in our reviews is referring to.

Roasting Fundamentals: Decafs

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The classic decaf flavors that most people think of are the overwhelming maltiness and in the worst cases the wet cardboard flavors of both aged and damaged coffees, but these flavors are generally either the results of the original quality of the coffee itself or the intensity of the decaf processing. When the right coffee is selected and the process is carefully monitored, a good deal of the coffee's characteristics should survive. A really great decaf shouldn't taste all too differently than before it was processed for decaf.

The Perfect Roast?

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There's a phrase I've been guilty of using in the past, but now really bugs me. The gist of it is:

"I'm just trying to roast the coffee to show its best qualities, without showing my influence over it."

Stretchin' Out the Roast pt. 2

Quality: 
5

 In part 1 of Stretchin' Out the Roast we looked at the effect of stretching out the time and development between 1st and 2nd crack during the roast. The greatest effect was on the perceived acidity and the type of sweetness in the cup from malt to candy, then fruit and  into bittersweet-cocoa-type sweetness. In this article we look at the effect of stretching out the 1st crack itself and how that changes the sweetness, body, and acidity in the finished roast.

Stretchin' Out the Roast: Part 1

Quality: 
5

This article details one method to determine an ideal roast for a coffee;  in four roast experiments, the time between the end of 1st crack and the beginning of 2nd crack is lengthened, and the roast stopped at the same point each time.  Then by tasting and comparing the results, I arrive at some conclusions about what roast brings out the characteristics of the coffee I enjoy more.  Other articles will cover the effect of stretching other segments of the roast.

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